Tag: events

Giving Tuesday

If you saw the title of this post and wanted to immediately move on, this post is for you!

I totally get if you want to pass on Giving Tuesday. You’re busy, it’s too big for you, and with as many times as you get asked to give that day, you don’t want to put your donors through that.

And since you’ve begun reading this, give me just another minute to share some ideas with you.

First, whether you decide to participate in Giving Tuesday or not, take some time to make sure your website is ready for new donors. How easy is it to donate? Is it clear what the impact of the donation is? Is there information on how a donor can connect with you directly?

Next, take a moment or two to review your social media. Is your most recent post on Twitter from last year? Are your Facebook photos up to date?

Now, consider peer-to-peer fundraising! This is a great way to engage with donors and their friends, and Giving Tuesday is a fantastic way to introduce this.

Now consider Giving Tuesday. It could be a great time to share your impact on social media. It could be a great day to just thank your donors. It could also be a good day to have an event that promotes your organization and mission. You can use Giving Tuesday to promote it among supporters and the press.

I love Giving Tuesday because it allows even the smallest of nonprofits a chance to ride on the coat tails of a huge event. Simply using the hashtag #GivingTuesday on that day and the days prior may get you in front of people who don’t know you. I’ve also had success in planning events that go along with the day.

Give it a try!

Thanks for reading. Any questions? dan (a) altrui.org

Stay in today

A lot of recovery programs promote “one day at a time”, meaning stay in today, stay in the moment. As nonprofit year-end fundraising campaigns go into full throttle mode, this thought can be super helpful. Stay in the moment.

Do everything you can to rock your campaign, and while working on it stay in the day. Don’t let negative thoughts hang out (or at least too long), and focus on what you can do that day.

Then do the same the next day. Some times taking deep breathes help too. I’m in no way saying that whatever you are experiencing isn’t important, my point is to focus on what you do best, and let the rest go. You’ve been here before and you’ve rocked it.

The world is different. And you’ve pivoted. What hasn’t changed is that your donors still want to support your mission and impact, and they want to be asked to help.

Surround yourself with others working their butts off in the arena. Don’t listen to naysayers. Remember all of the work you have done throughout the year to support this year-end campaign.

Wishing you the absolute best! Thanks for reading.

Shared nonprofit concerns

I am back home after my second Altrui road trip this year. This one was to Denver, where I spent most of my nonprofit fundraising time and where I am fortunate to call many nonprofit leaders friend. I ended the trip in Las Vegas where I am slowly building new relationships.

After dozens of conversations within the past couple of weeks with those directly involved in nonprofit fundraising, I can tell you that there are many shared concerns.

First on the list of concerns is fundraising. Most I spoke with had already been in solid communication with donors and funders and were relying on years of “donor love” practices that meant they were in solid relationship with their donors. Nonetheless they were still concerned about fundraising efforts and future funding.

Each person I met with had canceled a fundraising event. Half had created a new virtual event and all had created a fundraising campaign to make up some of the lost revenue of canceled events. I had several conversations on the success of virtual events and the success of asking corporate supporters to continue sponsorship with or without an in-person event. More and more are getting comfortable with the thought of creating successful virtual events.

Some of those I met with had furloughed or laid off staff, or were about to starting in July. My hope is with donor-centered approaches to fundraising along with virtual events that this does not become the norm for nonprofits.

Board support was half positive and half negative, so if you’re struggling with some on your board, which by the way may not be new, you are definitely not alone. Some board members have transitioned well to this tougher world and others have not. Consistent communication and one and ones can help, along with being as clear as ever in explaining what you need from each board member and the impact of their support.

If you have felt overwhelmed you are not alone. If you have felt sad you are not alone. If you have felt hopeless, again, not alone. You are also not alone if you have felt excitement with the successes you are having and large doses of hope as donor after donor continues to show up in support. Every person I met with has embraced their own personal creativity and that of their teams in focusing on solutions that enable them to continue their life-changing programs.

Interested in my thoughts around actions one can take based on all of my conversations? Sure! Here you go!

Connect with other nonprofit leaders and fundraisers.

Don’t give up on special events. Look into a virtual one.

Keep communicating with donors and funders. How are they?

Keep your website current. This includes current contact information.

Share your impact.

Lastly, whether this is our new normal or not, keep pivoting to meet the needs of your organization and your staff. Keep your programs strong and impactful. More than ever, our worlds needs strong nonprofits making the world a better place.

If you would like to talk about how Altrui might be able to support your fundraising and relationship-building efforts, please send an email to dan@altrui.org

Thank you for reading!

Your donors are with you!

I have written many blog posts about building relationships with donors and using donor-centered principles with donors. For me, this is the right thing to do, to treat donors as people, people who care about your impact, and not like an ATM machine.

It always pays off. It especially pays off in times like this. Your big fundraising dinner has been canceled. The revenue attached to the dinner impact all of your programs. In some cases, it’s your biggest fundraiser of the year and your entire program relies on it being a success. And now it’s not happening.

But wait. This is not a great position to be in and at the same time you are not alone. Your donors are with you. Many of them not only understand the impact you will have with the revenue from the canceled event, they are in fact in a position to still support you. Ask them to let you keep the sponsorship donation of the price of the tickets they purchased. You have nothing to lose, and my experience so far last week has been that many people are saying yes.

Some nonprofits have an online auction attached with their event. No need to cancel that. Get the word out through an email blast and your social media platforms. Consider keeping the auction up longer than you had planned. The difficult times we’re having will pass, and people like me will be excited to take the weekend getaway to a super sweet resort they won.

Phone calls to your supporters are always a great idea. Personal notes. A video from a program person showing the impact of the continued giving. Take the time. Time with and for donors is not only the way to go, it always pays off. Remember to check in with your donors about how they are as well.

I have weekly video tips I post on my YouTube channel as well as on the AltruiConsulting Instagram page.

Thanks for reading!

With deep gratitude

This post is all about gratitude. A huge thank you to so many who have supported me and the growth of Altrui. March is my sixth month in business and a good time to say thank you.

Thank you for being by my side. For continually reminding me that I got this, and that I can rock this.

Thank you to all of my peers in consulting who have taking time out of your busy schedules to answer my questions and give me direction.

Thank you to all of those accountants on social media who have gently educated me on what I need to be doing in regards to my accounting. Because of you I have an accountant and a QuickBooks account!

Thank you to all of my fellow nonprofit fundraising professionals who have so much experience in the consulting side of this and have constantly reached out to offer support.

Huge thanks to all of you who have recommended me and Altrui! Because of you I am working with more clients that I expected I would be with such a short time in the business.

Thank you to all of my clients! You have entrusted your fundraising to me and I will never forget that. I am forever grateful.

And thank you to everyone who has connected with my on social media. Altrui is new on Instagram and Facebook, and having support on these platforms as I grow is super helpful.

Sending big love and gratitude.

Thanks for reading!


Altrui Consultancy

EXPERT NONPROFIT DEVELOPMENT & SUPPORT
© Altrui Consultancy. All rights reserved.

Web Design by: UUDLY